Photographers often pack a lot of goofy goodies in their bags: sewing kits, vaseline-coated filters, Lensbabies, old video camera lenses, kleenex, rubber bands and 3×5 cards. All useful things for shooting creatively. I like to pull out the Lensbaby sometimes, and play around with some fun apertures. Here are a few photographs from this lovely Northwest week.

While photographing for another project today, a gorgeous autumn day at Portland’s Riverview Cemetery, I took a few other images as well. Here’s a portrait of Amanda:

And a portrait of Stephanie at Peninsula Park:

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Two weeks ago, I walked in to Pacific Northwest College of Art to teach a photography class. Inside the entrance, I was saddened to see a memorial for Tracey Sparling, the 19-year old who had been killed when a cement truck turned into her bike lane and crushed her. I had heard of the accident, but hadn’t known she was a current PNCA student, and though I didn’t know Tracey, her part in the PNCA community brought the tragedy one step closer to me, and I was deeply saddened by our loss.

Just 3 years ago, this same spot in the entrance to PNCA showcased a memorial to my dear friend and classmate Sebastian Garrido-Bor. To this day, I will catch myself glancing at a tall, thin, dark-haired stranger on a sidewalk or store, and think, “Hey, is that Sebastian…,” wanting to go and shake his hand, give him a hug, and hear him say in his South American accent, “How are you doing, my friend?” only to be reminded of the hole he left in the world when he died of cancer.

Last Tuesday, on my way out from teaching an evening photography class at the school, I noticed that Tracey’s photograph had been removed from its pedestal. The next morning, I entered the school to find the same pedestal topped with a new photograph and flowers. In the frame was a yearbook photograph of my friend Brett Jarolimek, with a piece of paper taped to the front: “1976-2007”.

Brett and I went to PNCA together, studied art history together. Though a painting major, he enjoyed taking photographs, and would show me what he’d been up to now and then, asking me for feedback. He was, like me, lanky, always smiling, friendly and warm. When I’d go in to Art Media, he’d make me feel extra welcome. Shannon and I went to an art opening of his work, on Mississippi. I was always happy to run into him, and doing so never failed to brighten my day. Even the memory of him brings a smile to my face.

Grief is a difficult place to be writing from. Brett was a sweet guy, and his death is tragic on so many levels. His loss to his friends and family, and to his community, is real and deeply felt. Though young (31), he had touched many lives with his cheer and kindness, friendship and artwork and love for bike racing. He will be terribly missed by those closest to him, but even those graced with only the briefest exchange with him–in the Bike Gallery, or at an art gallery–must know their loss. The world will be poorer without him.

So it is with great sadness that I write this memorial, and wish Brett’s family my condolences. Know that his short time here was not wasted, and that his friendship was a blessing to many.

A memorial Ghost Bike was set up at the intersection of N Interstate and Greeley,
where Brett was crushed by a garbage truck October 22, 2007.
He was well-loved, as evidenced by the artwork, flowers, and biking gear left in his honor.

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It’s a beautiful week for outdoor fall portraits here in Portland. Owen is a sweet child, and he and his beautiful mom worked with me as the sun was fading in the west, creating some fun and poignant portraits.






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  • October 28, 2007 - 1:52 am

    alicia marie - I somehow need to teleport you to Southern California to take some portraits of Judah.

  • October 28, 2007 - 5:19 pm

    FritzPhoto - I travel wherever people want to send me to photograph!

Skeleton in the Closet
Stories from the lives of those affected by eating disorders.

I’m pleased to announce the culmination of the past 2 years’ of work on my photo documentary on eating disorders. Please join me for this exhibition in the beautiful Littman Gallery, at Portland State University. The show includes 42 photographs with accompanying texts.

October 4-24, 2007

Littman Gallery
PSU, Smith Center, 2nd Floor, Room 250
1825 SW Broadway
Portland

Gallery open Monday-Friday, 12-4 pm

Please join us for the opening reception:
First Thursday, October 4, 5-7 pm

This body of work made possible in part by a grant from RACC.

For More Information:

Fritz Liedtke:
www.fritzphoto.com/thinkontrol

Littman Gallery: (503) 725-5656

Jennifer Stoots Fine Photography:
www.photostoots.com

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  • October 10, 2007 - 8:14 pm

    Dustin and Katie - How cool! Congratulations! You’re pictures always impress us!

After a photo shoot in Long Island, NY, my friend Rich Swingle and I raced out to Long Beach before the sun set, hoping to get in the water on one of the last warm days of the season. We arrived, and walked up the boardwalk facing the ocean. Looking to our left, the full moon was just rising above the horizon, and to the right, the red sun was setting. Same size orbs on either end of the horizon, perfectly symmetrical.

Here’s my poorly assembled panoramic of the scene. (When, oh when, will someone come out with a great panoramic digital camera? Or even a poor one? Anything! Please!)


But my favorite thing to do, of course, is watch people. As I was there on the boardwalk, watching the sun set, this young couple came up the ramp from the beach. The boy was carrying a skateboard, its wheels and underside coated in thick, wet sand. He came over and asked if I had a light, and we started talking. They’d been trying to skate on the sand at the water’s edge, and both agreed that it hadn’t been a successful venture. He’s from Hawaii, and she’s from France. They graciously allowed me to photograph them there on the boardwalk, in the failing sunlight.

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New York City is a big place and, as my second photographer Evie noted, from looking at the outside of a building you can’t often tell what amazing things you’ll find on the inside. This is certainly true of the Angel Orensanz Foundation, which is on a narrow street on the Lower East Side. From the outside it blends in with most of the other old brick buildings. But on the inside it’s fairly awe-inspiring.

The same could be said of Brooke and Ryan. We had not met prior to their wedding day, living on opposite coasts. But what a pleasure they were to work with–affable and full of laughter, easy-going but organized. And what a beautiful day it was.



We started in Bryant Park, photographing their family and wedding party. We weren’t 5 minutes into portraits when a police officer comes up and asks Evie, “Do you have a permit?” Evie caught on pretty quick, and started talking with the officer, and I started shooting as quickly as I could. In the end, she distracted him well enough that he wandered off and let us photograph unhindered. And the light–and people–were wonderful.


At the Orensanz building–formerly a Jewish synagogue–we were at first struck by how dingy it felt. But as time went on we discovered that it wasn’t funky, it was full of texture. And light. They have a professional lighting technician working there, and every part of this old building interior is given added atmosphere with beautiful lighting, which changed as the use of the space transitioned throughout the evening.

New York city wedding photography at Angel Orensanz building

There are far too many great images to post here!  View a selection of their wedding photographs on our destination wedding photography website, at www.fritzphoto.com.
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  • October 31, 2007 - 3:14 pm

    Anonymous - What a gorgeous location for a wedding! Looks like you all had a lot of fun. 😉 Good job Fritz…as always, you’re photos are beautiful.

  • September 19, 2008 - 2:37 pm

    Anonymous - “I scoured New York City for a photographer that had the same editorial style that my friend had gotten for her wedding. After my 15th call I was ready to throw in the towel when my husband suggested I see if my friend’s photographer travelled for weddings. How lucky I was when he said he did. The shots were everything I had hoped they would be. Fritz couldn’t have been easier to work with, and fast!! He had my pictures posted online 3 days after the wedding. I just wish he’d move to NYC now!”

  • November 11, 2009 - 9:02 pm

    Julie and David in Long Island, New York * Destination Wedding Photographer » Fritz Photography - […] problem, I told her.  I photographed a wedding in New York City a couple years ago, have photographed there numerous times, and love working […]

I’m in New York City for a few days, here to photograph a wedding, among other things. Spent the day today on the town, adventuring with Evie, my second shooter. We covered Ground Zero, the free Staten Island Ferry (leaving in the sun and returning in a downpoor), Carnegie Delicatessen, and MOMA. And after that, dinner with friends.

A few photo stories and observations before bed:

One of the few places I felt drawn to visit in NYC was Ground Zero. Worldwide turmoil began here, six years ago, and I wanted to see the place for myself.

To be honest, there’s not much to see. For the most part, it’s a very large area surrounded by fences and covered in construction. There is a temporary-feeling tent with some posterboards, showing the design of the future memorial and new skyscrapers, and a list of the nearly 3,000 people that perished that nightmarish day. And a new transit station. But not much else.

We wandered upstairs and down, and were about to leave, when we heard the faint sounds of a flute, making out the notes of Amazing Grace. I made my way over and found a homeless-looking man, seated on the ground, playing this tune over and over. Most appropriate.

A couple observations on the ferry ride:



This last image on the ferry seems like a fitting visual allegory for prayer, or intercession.

And finally, a boy watching a performance in Central Park:

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A friend of mine just emailed me, and said I was at third place in Portland Citysearch’s Best of 2007. Considering that I didn’t know anything about it, and didn’t ask anyone to vote for me, I guess that’s pretty good! I even have a nice review on there.

Check it out here.

And if you know my work, or have worked with me, feel free to leave a review for me there. That would be sweet. Assuming you like me.

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“High Desert Journal and tbd advertising have partnered to present monthly art shows. Each show opens with a First Friday reception. High Desert Journal brings work from artists published in the magazine to the community walls of tbd advertising. The work hangs all month and is for sale.

“Photography by Fritz Liedke will be in display at tbd loft during the month of September. The show will open during First Friday on September 7th at 5 to 9 p.m. with a reception. The photography of Fritz Liedke will hang through the end of the month.

“High Desert Journal is a literary and visual arts magazine dedicated to further understanding the people, places and issues of the interior West, a distinct region abounding in history, creativity and flux. By way of memory, imagination and story, the pages of High Desert Journal represent an ongoing and necessary conversation – a conversation that charts the changes, represents today and lends itself to the future.

“tbd advertising is an agency where there are no preconceived notions. No formulaic thinking. The answer is always “to be determined.” They work with such clients as Deschutes Brewery, Oregon Chai and Brooks Resources.

“tbd loft is located at 856 NW Bond Street, suite 2 above Norwalk Furniture, in downtown Bend, Oregon.”

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In spite of the fact that the menu at McMenamins is pretty much the same at every location, I do love this local monopoly on cool social venues. The art is fun, the grounds are always interesting to explore, the gardeners have a great time, and it’s fascinating to see old spaces infused with new life.

So taking photographs of a wedding–like the one above, at McMenamins Edgefield–is always fun.


After the wedding ceremony, I heard Marcus telling a friend: “Whenever I started to choke up, I just looked across the room at this painting of Saddam playing the bagpipe, and I relaxed.”

I’ll never look at that painting in the same way again.

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